Program Fellowship

2017/2018 Season 

Home on the page: towards a feminist public
Series by Program Fellow: Emily Gaynor

+ Upcoming events:

Cavities Magazine Issue 1 Showcase
Fri. December 15, 7-9pm

- Past Events

soho20 image

Image by Ruby Lavin

When we read, when we write, we activate a third space, apart from ourselves and the page or screen, yet still essential to both. For instance, reading theory has the capability to texture the reader’s world in previously unknown ways. Writing and reading history can change an entire generation’s perception of their past and present realities. Words on a page have the power build layers into our world, injecting it with fantasy, mystery, romance, color, and life. A specific order of words has the ability to create a silent public, changing the direction of thought and culture.Through the act of reading we bring words alive, and simultaneously they bring life to us– a symbiotic relationship that often goes overlooked. What tangible changes do we, can we make based on the unseen reality we bring to life when we read and write?

Similarly, the concept of home is caught between the theoretical and physical. The word home carries with it connotations of safety, security, and comfort. As countless artists and writers have expounded, home can extend beyond geography and exist internally–a space unable to be mapped, yet continuously affecting our lived reality. In a landscape so saturated with normative perspectives, how can we queer these spaces through our participation in literature?

SOHO20 Gallery presents Home on the page: towards a feminist public, a four-part series of events to take place over the 2017/2018 season. By inviting feminist publications from across different sectors of art and literature, we aim to explore the effect art/literature has on its environment and vice versa, and how publics are formed. Through panels, readings, and other events, we will activate the gallery as a hub of art and thought, create a space for discussion and debate, strengthen and extend our community, consider how can art facilitate a sense of home, and furthermore how the idea of home itself can encompass our constantly evolving notions of security and community.

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